9 Answers To Help You Fix Yellow Toenails

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Erica Kim By Erica Kim | Author

Are You Susceptible To Yellow Toenails?

Yellow toenails are often caused by the application and removal of toenail polish, weakened immune systems, circulation problems, diabetes, or the genetic disorder of actual Yellow Nail Syndrome. It can also be triggered by weak or brittle toenails and lymphedema. You might also make yourself increasingly susceptible to a fungal infection or yellow toenails if you partake in athletic activities. This article will answer some questions you may have and get you on the path to fix yellow toenails for good.

1Just What Is Yellow Nail Syndrome?

If you have any yellow toenails, you need to take it seriously. Get a podiatrist to check it out, although do not confuse this with Yellow Nail Syndrome, which is a rare genetic disorder. An individual with actual yellow nail syndrome has noticeable thickening, and their toenails are yellow or yellow-greenish.

Patients suffering from yellow nail syndrome often have pleural effusions, which is excess fluid in spaces around the lungs, which compromises breathing. It's a systemic disease, like lymphedema (localized tissue swelling and fluid retention), or yellow dystrophic nails that didn't properly develop. In the majority of cases, an individual with yellow toenails likely has a fungal infection, but not Yellow Nail Syndrome.

2Are Yellow Toenails The Result Of Fungus?

In many cases, toenail fungus leads to yellow toenails. Fungal infections in nails are often triggered by personal habits, like wearing shoes manufactured with non-breathable materials which allow sweat to get mixed with bacteria. Other possible causes might include not letting toenails air out or walking barefoot in public places that are wet. Fungi thrive in moist, warm, dark places like a close-toed shoe.

Athletes are individuals that spend a lot of their time in one single pair of shoes doing repetitive movements such as running, jumping, stopping, and starting. Each one of these makes toes more vulnerable to potential trauma. Wearing the very same shoes day in, day out, particularly with a lot of sweat and not being aired out in between, promotes bacterial and fungal infections, which might lead to something like discolored toenails.

3What Treatment Options Are There?

For a milder infection, you might get prescribed something like a medicated polish. That usually has the ingredient ciclopirox. You actually apply this polish yourself everyday for from six to as many as nine months, or until the infection is totally gone, which can take up to a year.

More severe infections might see your doctor offer an oral antifungal medicine like Lamisil or Sporanox. Should these treatment methods not work, your physician might think about a surgical removal of any toenail that is yellow and infected. That's often done when any patient is no longer able to walk around otherwise function on that toe. Typically, the removal of any infected nail lets a new one have a chance to grow in, but that might take as long as a year.

4What Side Effects Do Treatments Have?

A number of treatment medications have known side effects. However, certain medications only contain a single or pair of key natural ingredients. Having said all this, there's one product available that's widely assumed to not have side effects.

Zetaclear has a number of key natural ingredients, such as clove oil, lavender oil, jojoba oil, and tea tree oil. Each one of these has soothing properties and anti-fungal behaviors. Consult your doctor about the specific side effects of particular medications, and then ask him or her which distinct products they would recommend for you.

5Do Nail Gels Work?

Be mindful of the fact that yellow toenails rarely go away by themselves. Nail gels are often effective in treating milder cases. Nonyx Nail Gel and Mycocide NS are two products that are popular. Mycocide NS is clinically tested, and is an antimicrobial solution which penetrates a nail, killing any germs that might be causing the infection. Apply this product twice daily for as many as six months to your toenails.

Nonyx Nail Gel proves to be a popular podiatrist recommendation. It's known to first breakdown and then clean up any buildup underneath nails. By penetrating the nail plates and lowering pH levels, it promotes a healthier environment in which new nails can grow into. Either of these gels is more effective when done in conjunction with regular podiatrist supervision.

6Is This Something You're Able To Prevent?

You should always wear clean socks, as well as shoes made from materials that are breathable. During treatment, make sure you follow all your doctor's instructions to the letter. Don't walk barefoot in any areas that are damp and public. Don't share clothes, bathmats, or towels when you are healing or having a fungal infection, or if the other person has one on their own. Clean as well as dry your toes and feet daily and thoroughly.

If your toenails are yellow or you have toenail fungus, there are a few things you can do prevent spreading the infection to others. Don't walk around barefoot in an area that someone might personally come into contact with or share towels with them. Always keep your shoes or sandals on in public showers, health spas, gyms, and locker rooms. If at all possible, avoid swimming pools and areas where others might be barefoot.

7When Should You See Your Podiatrist?

Avoid getting into contact with anyone that has a fungal infection. Talk to your doctor about all the possible treatment methods prior to using any product. Consult your doctor when you first see discoloration. Maintain appropriate toenail and foot hygiene. Avoid cutting your nails short, and always make cuts straight across.

When you first see any sign of infection, contact your podiatrist. Discuss treatment options, including OTC products that might be advantageous to you. Ask any and all questions you have about yellow toenails.

8What Questions Do You Need To Ask Your Podiatrist?

Here are a few questions that you might want to ask your own doctor regarding yellow toenails. What sort of fungus actually caused yellow toenails in your case? How long do you need to wait before you resume typical activities, such as swimming, team sports, or working out in a gym? Just how severe is my condition? What other symptoms do I need to look out for that might suggest treatment isn't working, and how long should I wait to come back to you regarding this?

Can you examine my shoes and tell me if they're appropriate for certain activities (bringing in multiple pairs of your commonly worn shoes is advisable)? How can I prevent passing this onto my family members if I share a tub or shower with them? What over-the-counter products can you recommend or suggest? Are there associated side effects with the choice of treatment you're going to use?

9How Long Does This Condition Usually Last?

The ideal way of getting your toenails back to their natural coloration depends on what caused the discoloration. If your nails got stained due to polish, then you might have to wait for the nails to grow out in order to restore their natural color. If, however, the discoloration is caused from a more underlying condition like diabetes, then managing that condition might be necessary to see the improvements you're looking for.

If you're infected, a number of treatment options exist. Your primary care physician, or even a podiatrist, can determine what your proper treatment method to fix yellow toenails should be. He or she are going to base the treatment decision on the extent and severity of any infection present.